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1. Introduction

21/06/2020 in Blog

What is agenda 2030? it is a plan of the United Nations Organization approved on September 25th 2015 to transform the method through which the development that has consumed resources no longer reproducible has been produced, irreversibly damaged the environment and produced substantial changes also in the climate. The 2030 agenda includes 17 objectives for which 169 targets are defined and 240 statistical indicators through which the approaches to the sustainable development goals followed by the various countries will be monitored and progress made up to 2030 will be measured.

To achieve the goals of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development, the commitment of all the actors who work together in different sectors is required, sharing financial resources, knowledge and skills.

The strategy implemented by agenda 2030 provides partnerships for sustainable development by providing multi-stakeholder initiatives voluntarily undertaken by governments, intergovernmental organizations, interest groups, associations, orders and professional organizations, companies and networks of companies or professionals aimed at competing for achievement of objectives.
The process has already started some time ago, with commitments made for the implementation of the objectives and for sustainable development agreed at intergovernmental level, such as agenda 21, the johannesburg implementation plan, the millennium declaration, the final document of the united nations conference on sustainable development (rio + 20) entitled “the future we want”, the third international conference on island states of small islands; the 2030 agenda for sustainable development represents the current organized framework.
Objective 17 on sustainable development, which states “strengthening the means of implementation and revitalizing the global partnership for sustainable development”, recognizes partnerships between the various actors as important vehicles for mobilizing and sharing knowledge, skills, technologies and financial resources for supporting the achievement of development goals in all countries, particularly those in the developing world. objective 17 also seeks to encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships based on the partnership’s experience and resource strategies.
This document establishes the guidelines of the waa for agenda 2030 action plan for the period 2020-2030 which will include both monitoring and updating every three years at the triennale.

2. THE EXPO2015 EXPERIENCE OF THE GLOBAL FARM OF THE FUTURE 2.0

20/06/2020 in Blog

The Global Farm of the Future 2.0 wanted to represent “the unit of measurement” of the evaluation of the “well-being” of the Planet, a “comparison” between the environmental and productive components that determine the degree of pressure and therefore of sustainability. The method innovation was to consider the planet as a large puzzle made up of farms and therefore, with their behavior, they are the thermometer with which to measure their state of efficiency. Hence the need for the realization of the concept of Fattoria Lab 2.0, a laboratory that is inserted in the territorial contexts and in the companies where through the work of the agronomists and foresters new solutions are developed for the sustainability of the productions and the relative identity of the communities.

The pavilion wanted to materialize the contextual representation of the participation project of the World Association of Agronomist.

In the semester of representation of the universal exposition, the participation program Global Farm of the Future 2.0 was implemented. In particular, the following were highlighted:

• the best agronomic practices;

• comparison of practices in different territorial contexts;

• the flows of innovation and its transfer;

• the ways of producing food in relation to its territory;

• sustainable growth and identities of local communities.

The centrality of the role of the agronomist in the design of food production and in the sustainability of choices was the central topic of EXPO 2015.

The Pavilion represented the iconographic message that through design has become a communication tool for knowledge. .

The popular, iconographic and multimedia activities that highlighted the profession’s activities focused on the study of the dynamics of the Global Farm, exemplifying the behaviours with respect to the following Focus:

• Biodiversity and genetic improvement

• Sustainability and Productivity

• Local development and identity

• Food and food waste

• Project culture and social responsibility

• Climate change and production area

These themes were the subject of activities and conferences within the exhibition space during the period of the international event.

The Global Farm of the Future 2.0 was not only an ambitious communication project of the agronomist profession, but also a new way of measuring sustainable development through the Farms unit of measurement, the Global Farm Lab.

The pavilion built at EXPO 2015 is a prototype experience. It had the objective of entering the different communities, groups of agricultural and agri-food companies, to promote development models where research and innovation develop from the bottom up.

The structure built in EXPO2015 was designed to be completely “reusable” once the event has ended. The development of the initiatives will also focus on urban contexts to promote the concept of urban farms as a tool for the productive conversion of the areas affected by de-industrialization processes, rapid socio-demographic transitions and strong migratory flows.

A real starting point, that of the Global Farm of the Future 2.0, for a sector that, seizing the extraordinary opportunity of EXPO and developing its legacy, wants to investigate its new deal, determined to overcome, once and for all, the pauperistic imagery with which we have been used to knowing it.

About

20/06/2020 in Blog

The Association

The World Association of Agronomists, known as AMIA, was founded by representatives from thirty countries on September 8, 1994 in Santiago, Chile, as a result of the First World Congress of Professionals in Agronomy.

The World Association of Agronomists is a non-governmental, non-political, non-religious, and no-profit international organization, and managed by agronomists only.
The Association’s executive body is the General Secretariat which is chaired by an agronomist from the host country, appointed by its Management Board as nominated by the president of the Association.

Objectives:

– Unify, coordinate and represent all the associations of agronomists in the world;

– Promote the practice of this profession, academic excellence and professional ethics;

– Promote the social and economic development of the rural sector and represent the “agrarian rights” in international forum and governments;

3. THE STRATEGY OF THE GLOBAL FARM OF THE FUTURE 2030

19/06/2020 in Blog

Our organization has started this journey with the project “The Global Farm of the future 2.0” for the participation in the universal EXPO2015 exhibition in Milan, six months of intense relationships, through which millions of people have been reached and sensitized to the theme of sustainability.

The Global Farm of the Future 2.0 represents the tool through which the Association will promote the WAA FOR AGENDA 2030 Action Plan with a digital platform in the dedicated portal where the good practices for the sustainability of the various pilot projects organized by the member associations will be collected.

The Global Farm of the Future is made up of physical installations, the Lab 2.0 Pilot Farms, called the Sustainability Campus, distributed in a network in the different countries of the national member associations with the implementation of projects that pursue one or more Agenda 2030 objectives among those selected by the Action Plan.

To develop the culture of sustainability, the project involves the creation of a Master’s degree in sustainable agronomic design in collaboration with the various universities in the countries of the member associations.

Every three years the results of the Pilot projects and the realization of cultural events will be represented within the framework of the Triennial of Sustainable Agronomy to be held in Milan in the Expo area.

The following action plan is shown:

  • The Sustainability Campus
    Fattorie Pilota Lab 4.0 Projects Network
  • The 2030 Digital Global Farm of the Future
    The Digital Platform of intangible representation e of management of the contents of the action plan
  • The Master in Sustainable Agronomic Design
    Training for sustainability
  • The International Triennial of Sustainable Agronomy
    The event of representation and monitoring of the Action Plan

4. THE DETECTED SDGs OBJECTIVES AND THE CORRELATION WITH THE GLOBAL FARM OF THE FUTURE 2030

18/06/2020 in Blog

For the implementation of the Action Plan, the objectives and targets consistent with the issues addressed during the universal exhibition in Milan, EXPO2015, were selected. In particular, the following Objectives and Targets were selected:

5. THE CAMPUS OF SUSTAINABILITY – THE GLOBAL FARM OF THE FUTURE 2030

17/06/2020 in Blog

The Sustainability Campus – The Global Farm of the Future 2030 is made up of the network of Pilot Farms that each develop a theme represented in the global farm of the future 2030 through a project coordinated by an association adhering to the WAA with its professionals in collaboration with Institutes of research, universities and public and private institutions.
As described in the chapter on the evolution of the Global Farm of the future 2.0 in the Global Farm of the Future 2030, it represents a laboratory for experimenting with punctual indicators that make it possible to measure sustainability on a small scale and therefore to associate them with the macro indicators indicated by AGENDA 2030 The structure of the Campus is as follows:

Objective

Target General Indicator

Focus Area

Action Specific Indicator

Pilot Project

In addition to the possibility of carrying out a pilot project for each national association, each professional or group of professionals belonging to WAA member associations / orders will be able to choose the development of a pilot project according to stable criteria and will commit to its realization in the ways and times. established.
The pilot project must be drawn up according to the scheme shown in paragraph 7 as an example.
All projects must be written on the www.waaforagenda2030.org portal and updated quarterly according to the monitoring provisions.
The pilot projects that can be activated refer to the different types identified by these guidelines and can be activated in one or more geographical areas in public or private farms, in rural or urban areas.
Each partnership must make the sources of funding and the related forms of collaboration known and transparent.

Each Pilot Project will be subjected to a technical and scientific investigation by a Commission made up of members designated by AWAF. The assessment determined by the Commission is final and cannot be appealed.
The selected pilot projects will be entitled to the WAA partnership and will contribute to the establishment of the Sustainability Campus of the Global Future Farm 2030.
The Pilot Projects carried out will participate by right in the International Triennial of Sustainable Agronomy.

Focus area: A

15/06/2020 in Blog

Climate Change and Production Territory

Climate change and production territories represent the indicator of crop adaptability to the production environment. The adaptability to different production environments compared to climate change measures the resilience capacity of agricultural production.
The contribution of the agricultural sector to climate change is fundamental. For the territories of production a long phase of new planning of agricultural systems opens, of their insertion and of their effectiveness to mitigate the effect of the change.

Goal 13
Promote actions, at all levels, to combat climate change
Target 13.1
Strengthen in all countries the resilience and adaptation to climate and natural disaster risks
Target 13.3
Improving education, awareness and human and institutional capacity with regards to climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

Goal 2
End hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
Target 2.4
Ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, which help protect ecosystems, strengthen capacity to adapt to climate change, extreme weather conditions, droughts, floods and other disasters and improve progressively soil quality

Goal 12
Guaranteeing sustainable production and consumption patterns
Target 12.2
Achieve sustainable management and efficient use of natural resource

Action 1

Design for adaptation to climate change

Each production area is characterized by multiple microclimates that are characterized primarily by latitude and altitude. Furthermore, the microclimates are determined by the orography and exposure of the lands that make up the various areas.

The climate is also important for giving soils different types and conditioning the agricultural productivity of the territories.

The change in climatic situations can induce the shift of production areas and the adaptability of agricultural species.

To overcome the inconveniences caused by climate change, a series of actions can be implemented that could significantly change the future agricultural production framework.

The adaptability of agricultural systems to climate change can be sought through the use of improved plant varieties, more suitable livestock breeds, crop rotations and alternative production strategies.

Climate change can lead to changes in territorial suitability.

To overcome these effects that can be fatal for the landscape layout of the territories, the agronomic research proposes cultivars adaptable to the changed climatic reality and genetic selection techniques that can introduce species resilience and their maintenance on the spot.

In agriculture, changes in environmental conditions are related to decreases in production caused by diseases.

Many plant diseases are in fact associated with global warming, which has as a consequence the increase in temperatures, the change in the quantity and distribution of precipitation, the drought, the increase in CO2 and ozone levels. These modifications can have an impact on the incidence and severity of diseases and influence the coevolution of plants and their pathogens.

Several studies have already shown numerous examples of the effect of climate change in some pathosystems in the past, but current trends are also quite alarming.

The international scientific community is aware that our planet will have to face the impacts of climate change. This will probably happen even if greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions will be significantly reduced in the coming decades by implementing mitigation policies on a global scale.

In this context, the potential expected impacts of climate change and the main vulnerabilities in agriculture and forestry for the planet can be highlighted in the worsening of the already existing conditions of strong pressure on water resources, with a consequent reduction in the quality and availability of water; alterations of the hydrogeological regime that could increase the risk of landslides, mud flows and debris, rock collapses and flash floods; possible soil degradation and higher risk of soil erosion and desertification; risk of forest fires and droughts for forests; risk of loss of biodiversity and natural ecosystems; risk of flooding and erosion of coastal areas due to a greater incidence of extreme weather events and rising sea levels (also in association with the phenomenon of subsidence, of both natural and anthropic origin); potential reduction in agricultural productivity especially for wheat crops, but also for fruit and vegetables.

To this end it is necessary to design adaptation measures in order to prevent natural disasters, to manage natural resources in a sustainable manner and to protect the environment. In this sense, design must be sufficient to adequately address the consequences of climate change impacts. A coherent and clear strategic approach is therefore necessary for the implementation of an action plan that guarantees that the adaptation measures are adopted promptly, are effective and consistent in terms of sustainability.

Planning for adaptation to climate change must respect the general principles consolidated at global level. Although there is no univocal and commonly shared definition of “successful adaptation” or “optimal adaptation”, the principles of timeliness, effectiveness and sustainability must guarantee the achievement of objectives without at the same time creating negative repercussions in other contexts or sectors involved.

Activable Pilot Projects

Pilot Projects may concern one or more targets of the objectives identified as well as one or more general indicators. For the purposes of verification and measurability and related accounting in the definition of the executive design, specific indicators will be identified among those defined in the Global Indicator Framework 2019 of the SDG.

The pilot projects that can be activated in Action A.1 are the following:

1) Implementation of production techniques of some specific crops aimed at mitigating the greenhouse effect;

2) Design strategies in order to modify agricultural and productive systems in response to current or expected climate stimuli in order to reduce the effects and exploit the opportunities.

3) Introduction of company information systems for management and monitoring of the production area.  4. Consumer information and education strategies aimed at a greater awareness useful to direct the food demand towards seasonal productions with a lower production impact in view of a better sustainability of agricultural productions.

Focus area: B

14/06/2020 in Blog

Food and food waste

Food and food waste are indicators of the efficiency of agricultural production on a farm. The links of the food supply chain are evaluated with respect to the consumption production ratio. Another element of measurement is represented by the cultural diversity of consumption.

Food as a cultural brand: its choice also determines its social status. But how and how much to produce? It is necessary to give concrete technical answers to the inequalities and contradictions for the construction of a democratic society and a development perspective.

Goal 8
Encouraging lasting, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
Target 8.4
Progressively improve, by 2030, global efficiency in consumption and in the production of resources and attempt to disconnect economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the ten-year framework of programs relating to production and sustainable consumption, with the most developed countries in first line

Goal 12
Guaranteeing sustainable production and consumption patterns
Target 12.2
Achieve sustainable management and efficient use of natural resource
Target 12.3
Halve global per capita food waste at the retail and consumer level and reduce food losses during production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses
Target 12.8
Ensure that all people, in every part of the world, have the relevant information and the right awareness of sustainable development and a lifestyle in harmony with nature

Goal 15
Protect, restore and promote a sustainable use of the terrestrial ecosystem
Target 15.9
Integrate the principles of ecosystem and biodiversity into national and local projects, in development processes and strategies and reports for poverty reduction

On the one hand, statistics show the growth in the number of those suffering from hunger and to this contribute to the increase in food prices, the decrease in the economic resources of the poorest populations, the limited access to the market and food. On the other hand, it is confirmed that the land can sufficiently feed all its inhabitants. In fact, although in some regions low levels of food production remain, globally this production is sufficient to satisfy both the demand for current food and that expected in the future.

At the same time, these data indicate the absence of a cause-effect relationship between population growth and hunger, and this is further proven by the deplorable destruction of foodstuffs as a function of economic profit.

Hunger does not depend so much on material scarcity, but rather on the scarcity of social resources, the most important of which is of an institutional nature. That is, there is a lack of economic institutions able to guarantee access to regular and adequate food, and to meet the needs connected with primary needs and with the emergencies of real food crises.

In this context, the management of food production flows becomes crucial in supporting or not supporting the social development of producing populations.

It is therefore clear that “Designing Food” is needed.

By design we mean the set of planning and planning phases of activities that will lead to an expected result, which can be totally, partially or even missed.

Almost all human activities resort, more or less effectively, to planning through the most appropriate means, strategies and actions to achieve certain goals.

Specifically, “designing food” means organizing and rationalizing a supply chain activity.

In a process of supply chain the stakeholders operate, the various economic agents, who intervene directly or indirectly. The expected result is to satisfy consumers’ food needs in terms of nutritional needs, food quality and food safety, in a context of environmental sustainability and protection of social rights.

By virtue of these expectations, designing food is really complex and planning the food chain is a “work” in constant transformation given the increasingly numerous aspects that design must necessarily involve. In fact, planning choices cannot be ignored from considering some fundamental aspects such as safety, animal health and welfare, plant protection, food production and distribution, innovation in the food sector.

Food design also means protecting consumers from the risks associated with food, from the field to the farm and from the farm to the table.

The design machine is operated on the basis of the needs and demands of consumers, through which the supply chain is climbed upstream and the design strategies are set. To this end, the collection of data on food consumption trends and habits is crucial to better understand what is expected to be found on the table and better to guide the design choices.

Activable Pilot Projects

Pilot Projects can concern one or more targets of the objectives identified as well as one or more general indicators. For the purposes of verification and measurability and related accounting in the definition of the executive planning, specific indicators will be identified among those defined in the Global Indicator Framework 2019 of the SDG. The pilot projects that can be activated in Action B.2 are the following:

– Production planning and food requirements

– Food quality and production chains

– Food production flows and social development

– New consumers and changes in agricultural production

– Waste and energy

Focus area: C

13/06/2020 in Blog

Biodiversity and genetic improvement

Biodiversity and genetic improvement represent the indicator for measuring the ecosystemic complexity of a farm. It measures the criticalities of the simplification of production processes, of the monospecific nature of agronomic choices, of the use of modified genetic resources and at the same time of genetic variability aimed both at the perpetuation of the species and the greater resistance to threats caused by adversity.
If genetic improvement represents the scientific and professional progress of the agronomic world, it is necessary to take effective actions to stop the loss of biodiversity in order to ensure the resilience of ecosystems

Goal 2
End hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
Target 2.5
Maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants, farm and domestic animals and related wild species, including through diversified seed banks and plants that are properly managed at national, regional and international level; promote access and fair and equitable sharing of benefits deriving from the use of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as agreed at international level

Goal 15
Protect, restore and promote a sustainable use of the terrestrial ecosystem
Target 15.6
Promote a fair and equitable distribution of benefits deriving from the use of genetic resources and promote equitable access to these resources, as agreed at international level
Target 15.9
Integrate the principles of ecosystem and biodiversity into national and local projects, in development processes and strategies and reports for poverty reduction
Target 15.a
Mobilize and significantly increase economic resources from every source to preserve and sustainably use biodiversity and ecosystems

Action3

Planning and design of biodiverse food systems for resilient ecosystems

Biodiversity is the variability of living organisms and includes diversity within species (genetic diversity), between species and ecosystems. These are what are ordinarily defined as the three levels of biodiversity.

Biodiversity provides the basis of agriculture by maintaining in the evolution of a consistent genetic variability within the cultivated and raised species. To this end we speak of agricultural biodiversity or agro-biodiversity which includes all the components of biodiversity that, more specifically, are important for food and agriculture. In summary, everything that is of real interest in the agricultural sector, be it vegetable or animal and which man uses and / or has used in his own diet, defines agro-biodiversity.

Given the primary role of agricultural biodiversity in the environmental balance, the priority becomes the adoption of production models capable of supporting the ecosystem through active services that influence the places of cultivation or growth of species and breeds.

Agricultural biodiversity is the result of the natural selection that man has been able to identify and value for the interest that it has assumed for agriculture. Its conservation therefore depends on the correct management and application of sustainable production methods.

A characteristic of the main plant and animal species to which humanity is linked for its diet has been their ability to adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions. In addition, the diversity of crops also contributes to a selection in terms of quality of food that improves with the variety of foods consumed, particularly in fruit and vegetables. These aspects are very important when discussing the availability of foods that can contribute to nutritional diversification through different food diets that can contribute to the fight against malnutrition, obesity and other health problems in all parts of the world.

Activable Pilot Projects

Pilot Projects can concern one or more targets of the objectives identified as well as one or more general indicators. For the purposes of verification and measurability and related accounting in the definition of the executive planning, specific indicators will be identified among those defined in the Global Indicator Framework 2019 of the SDG.

The pilot projects that can be activated in Action C.3 are the following:

• Cadastre of agricultural biodiversity

• Genetic and functional characterization of biodiverse species

• Conservation of fertility and soil biodiversity

• Enhancement of native genetic resources.

Focus area: D

12/06/2020 in Blog

Sustainability and Productivity


Sustainability and productivity are the indicators of the efficiency of the use of natural and anthropic resources of a farm. The evaluation of efficiency is based on the accounting of production both in terms of consumption and in terms of the inputs / outputs.
How to produce more for new needs by limiting the impact on the environment? The methodological approach of the future must aim at the balance of resources through careful planning of consumption.

Goal 2
End hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
Target 2.3
Double the agricultural productivity and income of small-scale food producers, particularly women, indigenous peoples, farming families, shepherds and fishermen, including through secure and equitable access to land, other resources and productive inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for added value and non-agricultural occupations
Target 2.4
Ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, which help protect ecosystems, strengthen capacity to adapt to climate change, extreme weather conditions, droughts, floods and other disasters and improve progressively soil quality

Goal 12
Guaranteeing sustainable production and consumption patterns
Target 12.2
Achieve sustainable management and efficient use of natural resource
Target 12.4
Achieve eco-compatible management of chemicals and all waste throughout their entire life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release into the air, water and soil to minimize their negative impact on human health and the environment
Target 12.5
Substantially reduce waste production through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse

Goal 15
Protect, restore and promote a sustainable use of the terrestrial ecosystem
Target 15.3
Combat desertification, restore degraded lands, including those affected by desertification, droughts and floods, and strive for a world without soil degradation
Target 15.4
Ensuring the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity, in order to improve their ability to produce essential benefits for sustainable development

Action 4

Planning and design of sustainable agri-environmental systems

The design of production methods lays down the basic principles that govern the entire production process of agricultural systems.

The design of the production methods identifies the main agronomic phases that make up a production process, describing its basic purposes and the methods for achieving them that respect the environment and human, animal and plant health.

In particular, in the agronomic design phase, we examine the different types of soil processing, its fertilization, some good agricultural practices and the cultivation processes. The aim is to identify, through the phases of the whole process, which behaviors can contribute to a socially responsible agriculture.

The design of the soil processing serves to make the soil more porous and softer, to encourage plant growth and crop productivity. Through processing the soil is prepared for sowing, thus creating the conditions suitable for the burial and germination of the seeds and the penetration of the roots; the permeability of the soil is increased by favoring the infiltration of water and reducing phenomena of stagnation and erosion; the existing vegetation is eliminated and weeds are contained; the fertilizers are buried to nourish the soil.

In any case, when designing the production method it is necessary to bear in mind that there are different types of soil, therefore the choice of the method and the respective soil processing techniques is essential for the evaluation of the properties and characteristics of the soil to be cultivated and of the plant species that this must accept, of the risks of erosion and from the climatic conditions of the cultivation area. In general, deep machining with machines and tools that cause excessive burial of the active layer and damage the soil structure (compaction, pulverization, etc.) are to be avoided.

Maintaining the fertility of the soil remains a priority objective in the design of production methods: the plants derive the correct nutritional supply from the soil, consequently the more fertile the soil is, the more yields will be better and of high quality.

The alternative to soil fertilization with synthetic chemical substances consists in the use of natural mineral fertilizers and in organic fertilization.

Even appropriate cultivation techniques, such as rotation and green manure, fertilization with natural or organic fertilizers are more sustainable.

Precision farming is a technologically advanced form of agriculture, in which machinery is used that is equipped with “intelligent systems”, able to dose the production factors in relation to the real needs of the plot and to the different homogeneous areas within it.

This technique can be aimed at increasing productivity with the same overall inputs; to reduce inputs for the same productivity or to increase productivity while reducing inputs.

The technological progress achieved in terms of automation, management and processing of spatial data makes precision agriculture already potentially feasible from the farm, at least from a technical point of view.

However, the application of this innovative approach requires a thorough knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the fields, their mapping and storage, so that they can then be managed by a control computer.

Activable Pilot Projects

Pilot Projects can concern one or more targets of the objectives identified as well as one or more general indicators. For the purposes of verification and measurability and related accounting in the definition of the executive design, specific indicators will be identified among those defined in the Global Indicator Framework 2019 of the SDG.

The pilot projects that can be activated in Action D.4 are the following:

• Intelligent water systems

• Digital infrastructure to support production

• Methods for rationalizing production

• Implementation of agricultural waste recovery and recycling systems.